Weds 21 Jan: Crianlarich to Tarbet

Poor lil' fella ...

Poor lil’ fella …

Carcasses sag on the roads as remains
Decayed to skeletal shapes, or riven
Asunder to display red-ripe swollen
Innards slowly seeping new asphalt stains.
They were not to know the laws that dictate
Momentum and inclement instances
And increases in braking distances:
And thus they came to face their fall and fate.
Ecce homo, me, just an animal
Rambling the roads in a frenzied flurry
To duck obese-laden lorries that pass
Suddenly with speed and without signal,
Saved by my lane-leap and verge-hop scurry.
What good is sapiens in a carcass?

The entire collection of poems from this project was published by Eyewear in 2016. Only a sample of the 78 poems remain accessible on this website.

Fri 16 Jan: Kilchoan to Ardnamurchan Point to Kilchoan

Sadly, no 'Westernmost Point' marker. Also, no one around to take my photograph so you get a 'selfie' and some stylised shots.

Sadly, no ‘Westernmost Point’ marker. Also, no one around to take my photograph so you get a ‘selfie’ and some stylised shots.

There were times, at bedtime, when my daddy
Told the one lonely tale which he knew best,
The sino-story Journey to the West,
With its Magi heroes, Monk and Monkey.
Here I stand, having chased my father’s voice,
Rock under my feet, waves against the rock,
And waves all through the line of nine o’clock:
At journey’s end, there is only one choice.
I revolve around and roll the steps back
Through the path and through moments in my mind:
Regret, not compass, dictates direction.
All that I once did appears on the track,
Alongside all that I once wished to find.
Eastward I walk, in prayerful oblation.

Some bonus photographs: Here are a couple taken on the road between Kilchoan and Ardnamurchan Point.

Some bonus photographs: here are a couple taken on the road between Kilchoan and Ardnamurchan Point.

More bonus photographs: here are a couple taken on the same road, a part of my 'Animal Family Portraits' series (joking!).

More bonus photographs: here are a couple taken on the same road, a part of my ‘Animal Family Portraits’ series (joking!).

The entire collection of poems from this project was published by Eyewear in 2016. Only a sample of the 78 poems remain accessible on this website.

Sat 3 Jan: Dunnet Head to Wick

DunnetHead

At Dunnet Head, 8.15am.

Ahead, at shoulders with the morning mist,
The way is lit and temptingly begun,
By cloud-splintered rays of the rising sun:
Path and light are caught in conjugal kiss.
Excitement drives the eager heart onward,
One foot works, then the other of the pair.
In front lies the alluring morning air:
It is all too easy to move forward.
At my back arrive poundings of wind gust
And pummellings of hail. I pace on,
Feet stamping forward yet against my mind.
Memories distant decay into dust,
Memories cherished are too soon far gone:
Valued fragments of life lived, left behind.

The entire collection of poems from this project was published by Eyewear in 2016. Only a sample of the 78 poems remain accessible on this website.

Thurs 1 Jan: T minus 46 hours

Greetings from Inverness. It is 10.15am and I am writing from a golden aches café, which is one of the few establishments open here on New Year’s Day. It is my first visit to McDonald’s in many months – but I suppose that I am about to embark on a project which will involve many firsts. Over the past week, I have slowly made my way north; I reach Thurso tomorrow evening and I set off from Dunnet Head on Saturday 3 January.

In terms of weather, it is pleasantly temperate in the Highlands. On the 3rd, sunrise at Dunnet Head is due at 9.01am and sunset at 3.32pm. As I am walking south over the course of the next few months, and as the solstice has passed, it ought to be quite a good feeling to see more and more hours of sunlight each day.

A new year, a new venture: a 2015AD venture.